Debian net install
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Offline Challene

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Debian net install
« on: September 22, 2020, 05:25:33 PM »
Hello everyone!
I want to try to install debian using a net install(or install from the CD, but without X server), I've never done this on my main laptop(Only inside WM) and now I really want to try it on real hardware. Is there something that I need to know before trying? Something like -> If you'll not install this or this it can damage your hardware?
I believe that if I'll forget to install something, then something will not work, but can it really damage a hardware? I've read tons of topics on different forums and didn't found a clear answer about this. That's why I'm asking.
Also, you all know much more about linux than I do, so it's always good to ask first before trying.
P.S. I'm sorry for disturbing you with that question :)

Offline Spatry

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Re: Debian net install
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2020, 06:40:07 PM »
Unlike many DIY distros like Arch, Slackware or Gentoo, where you manually configure and install software; Debian is much easier to install as it will do most of the complicated options for you based on the questions you answered in the installer. The procedure is similar to what you did in virtualbox. If you know all of your hardware works with current kernels, you should be good to go. Your sandboxed installation should give you a taste of what you can expect. Good Luck.

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Offline CwF

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Re: Debian net install
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2020, 07:30:19 PM »
I can't speak to a virtualbox image, but a qemu/kvm qcow2 based image vm can transfer to media and be stuck in a real machine. ! And no, no damage. Things that don't work simply don't work, lots of examples.

Anyway, I keep a bare install from the net CD as a master image. ~600MB for Jessie to ~900MB for bullseye, and have strecth and buster versions too. The are fully equipped with ncurses based utilities and do have xorg facilities. They do not have logon managers or WM's or DE's. They can be used for a quick exploration of something in a vm, or written to an SSD and popped into any appropriate computer. Legacy bios vs uefi boot loaders are a concern, but it's all possible at maybe an advanced level. Digging deep you can change almost anything, on bare metal, virtualized, and most useful mounted on a host for direct manipulation. Full disk luks lvm is really the only fixed option.

I've build lots, all from a single install over 3 years ago. Think of it as 'flashing' instead of 'installing'. All is first arranged in the vm. Get good at it and a first time boot on a new computer is fully configured and error free.

Yes, there are lots of details!

Offline Challene

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Re: Debian net install
« Reply #3 on: September 23, 2020, 02:03:28 AM »
Thanks for your replies, Spatry and CwF! :)
Unlike many DIY distros like Arch, Slackware or Gentoo, where you manually configure and install software; Debian is much easier to install as it will do most of the complicated options for you based on the questions you answered in the installer. The procedure is similar to what you did in virtualbox. If you know all of your hardware works with current kernels, you should be good to go. Your sandboxed installation should give you a taste of what you can expect. Good Luck.


I've never tried Arch linux(Only arch-based Arco linux in a vm), but I don't think that rolling release distros will be the great choice for me. Slackware is one of my favorite distros and I'm still using it, but now decided to try something new(It's not distro-hopping, just for learning how things works) :)

I can't speak to a virtualbox image, but a qemu/kvm qcow2 based image vm can transfer to media and be stuck in a real machine. ! And no, no damage. Things that don't work simply don't work, lots of examples.
I'm using Qemu instead of virtualbox for a long time now and I've been thinking about that :)

Thanks again! :)