Win10 user transitioning to Arch
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Offline BadBrush

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Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« on: May 10, 2019, 06:54:27 PM »
Hey all! I feel I'm a bit of an anomaly among the linux community, I'm a professional artist working in animation. I've always loved computers and actually started my education with a comp sci degree but eventually transferred to Fine Art. Now I'm doing production art for animated movies and TV. I've always loved the open source community and have desperately wanted to transition to Linux, but I'm veeeeery deeply connected to Adobe Photoshop (it's pretty much an industry standard). I also used Maya a good deal, but Blender has become an AMAZING replacement and I use it full-time now. I'm now dual booting Arch Linux +i3gaps \ Windows 10 and I mostly log into Windows 10 to use Photoshop.

After botching my bootloader, I've finally got the system up-and-running and am now in the process of setting up my Wacom Cintiq to work appropriately with Arch and I'm hoping I can get GIMP to work as a replacement for Photoshop. That might take a bit of doing considering I have 10+ years experience using Photoshop.

Anyway, that's my story. Nice to meet you all!

Offline Crimson

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Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2019, 08:24:05 PM »
Adobe Photoshop (it's pretty much an industry standard)

No, Photoshop IS the industry standard.

As far as a native Linux solution goes, I tend to lean more towards Krita rather than GIMP. But let's not kid ourselves, either option is not the real thing. The only solution is to either get Photoshop working in WINE (if you're lucky it will install AND remain stable) or get Windows installed in a controlled Virtual Environment and install Photoshop in that. I would at least try WINE first because if it works, it will certainly provide a more seamless experience.

For example, I used GNOME Boxes for this and the old tried and true Windows XP as the OS of choice. Then after updating, not that it was needed, all I had to do was install Photoshop and that's it. I chose XP because I'm not a Photoshop professional, I just use it for basic tasks. Also, because XP is very light weight compared to the newer versions of Windows. Plus XP is very well supported in most every VM manager available (VirtualBox, VMWare, Boxes, etc.), meaning I didn't have to do ANYTHING to get XP 100% working.

So I hope this helps, welcome to Linux. Breathe that beautiful, fresh air of freedom. Have fun. And most importantly, enjoy making YOUR PC ACTUALLY personal again!
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Offline fchaos

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Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2019, 09:28:48 PM »
just FYI I use photoshop CS2 under Manjaro (an Arch derivative) on a regular basis with WINE.

Everything is functional with the exception of the file "Browse" feature... you have to use "Open" instead. and of course, you probably couldn't do any Adobe Updates.

But I have been running CS2 for years now, ever since Adobe offered their older, out of date versions free to registered users. Since CS2 is more than good enough for the work I do, it suffices.

(just mentioning this as an option, GIMP is also a good way to go, as well as other Linux native packages, but if you're wedded to PS, you can probably get it working under WINE... and barring that, you may be able to run win10 in virtualbox or other virtualizing software, and run PS that way)

Offline OrvilleG

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Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2019, 09:44:21 PM »
I've been able to do plenty with GIMP and Inkscape. They can't do everything that Photoshop and Illustrator can, but with some workarounds and extra plugins they do fine.

Offline BadBrush

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Re: Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2019, 09:47:29 PM »
just FYI I use photoshop CS2 under Manjaro (an Arch derivative) on a regular basis with WINE.

I actually saw that Photoshop CS6 is gold rated for Arch on the WineHQ compatibility list. I was hoping to get that up and running. I really enjoy using the mixer brush but I'm willing to sacrifice it for stability.

As Crimson said, it really is the industry. I've been to several studios and you don't see anything other that Photoshop. This WB project I'm on, they literally gave me an .abr (photoshop brush file) to do the finished background designs on. It's so ubiquitous that they basically assume you use it.

@byteau: I'm definitely willing to learn GIMP, krita and Inkscape, but it's probably going to be a while before I can accomplish what I do with PS.

Thanks everyone for the warm welcome!

Offline Spatry

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Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2019, 07:26:43 AM »
I use an OLD copy of Macromedia Fireworks 8 (The last edition before Adobe bought and destroyed it) in Wine... I have a development version of the gimp for additional layer effects Fireworks cannot do... Ultimately, 99% of all graphic work for the Cup of Linux show passes through my Macromedia studio. Sometimes I will use Blender too... I think Adobe Photoshop 4 was the last version of that software I owned... I took a liking to Macromedia LOL

At any rate, improvements in Wine will let you combat planned obsolescence and use your old software as long as you'd like. PlayonLinux (Wine front end) has a debugger which will give you clues to help you get software running. Combine that with Steam Proton and Winetricks and you have a powerful arsenal for getting your Windows applications running on your favorite Linux platform... and I must say... Arch is an AWESOME way to use Linux.
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Offline pip5528

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Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2019, 12:41:49 PM »
Nice to meet you! Arch is pretty awesome and a lot of people really know and love GIMP! I plan on installing Arch myself once I get the build parts I need. Welcome to the community!
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Offline fchaos

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Re: Re: Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2019, 09:11:55 PM »
I actually saw that Photoshop CS6 is gold rated for Arch on the WineHQ compatibility list. I was hoping to get that up and running. I really enjoy using the mixer brush but I'm willing to sacrifice it for stability.

if WineHQ says CS6 is Gold then there's no reason at all you should have much trouble running it.

Offline Crimson

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Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2019, 02:09:06 AM »
The only solution is to either get Photoshop working in WINE (if you're lucky it will install AND remain stable)

I need to retract my previous statement here. For S&G's, I installed CS6 using WINE 4.7 staging and Photoshop installed after installing some dependencies.

Code: [Select]
winetricks atmlib gdiplus msxml3 msxml6 vcrun2005 vcrun2005sp1 vcrun2008 ie6 fontsmooth-rgb gecko
I THINK I had to run this command too, but I may be getting it confused with another project I was working on at the same time. It would probably be a good idea to get .net anyway.

Code: [Select]
WINEARCH='win32' winetricks dotnet40
*NOTE: I have the x64 version of WINE, people are saying you're supposed to use the x86 version, but I'm not having any issues other than the x64 version of CS6 not running. It's not a deal breaker for me, the x86 version runs surprisingly very well for me.

So....yeah. WINE is totally a feasible route to take in using CS6 on Linux.

My previous attempts a year or two ago were so bad I just gave up on WINE as an option for a lot of things. (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻

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Offline tinkerer

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Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2019, 05:36:33 AM »
Welcome to this great forum BadBrush!

I made a foolish statement a few weeks ago that I no longer needed Windows because I had retired so did not need to use Word or Excel for reporting. I had the lofty idea of learning GIMP and to use only Linux applications, not even using Wine.

But Spatry and others were right - why give yourself the hassle of struggling with the learning curve with a new app, when your old one would work fine. I only needed to create graphics for some simple icons or simple gifs or to tidy up photos, I'm not a professional artist.  In my case my favourite graphics app was Paint Shop Pro 7, which is 19 years old. With a few minor issues, it worked fine under Wine.  There was another excellent program called Xara3D which made making 3D text effortless but unfortunately it does not work under Wine.

Common sense prevailed. I reinstalled Manjaro (MX Linux had too many issues for me) and created a VM using a registered Windows 7 disc. I loaded Xara3D and Paint Shop Pro 7 along with IrfanView. And as an added bonus, I found a second PSP7 disc celebrating 25 years of the app and on it was extra textures, brushes and stock graphics.

Windows may be a collection of bug-ridden crud, but the commercial applications certainly aren't.

Frank
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Offline CwF

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Re: Re: Win10 user transitioning to Arch
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2019, 12:40:13 PM »
I made a foolish statement a few weeks ago that I no longer needed Windows....
Since we're spoiled we often look at things wrong. The first day you got something new, and it works, is its last day of judgment. Years later, despite our view, that thing still works as good as it did. Maybe our expectation changes, maybe the OS surrounding the thing changed, maybe the new alternative is simply better. In no case is the original thing worse than it was on day one.

We're often also complacent and lazy. If it works like day one, you're done! However, there might be something better and it might be on the other side of effort. My theory is there is a threshold of wasted effort that hones future wasted effort. In other words, unless you've wasted effort many times with some success and some failure, you have a poor perspective on future wasted efforts. Or, the more time you've wasted, the less time you waste.

Some people think newer is always better. SNS, or something. They refuse the notion that some pinnacle could have come and gone. All best is always in the future. ? I'm on record already, XP was the pinnacle of desktop computing. Period. My expectation has changed, so it's no longer my primary OS, but it will never die off completely for me since it has obsolete functionality that works as good as it did when it wasn't obsolete. Some of that obsolescence has not been replaced.

IrfanView was mentioned, a prime example. There is no equal in the functionality and tightness of code in any OS, a pinnacle. I could mention a few more. Interestingly enough, some things matter less than they used to, like optical media. My debians don't have rip capabilities without drives. I don't know if there is anything better than EAC in the linux world.

I have much faith in the power of emulation and virtualization. I argued before XP existed that ultimately all islands of functionality will live in a future system that doesn't do anything but provide the platform for any and every guest. It gets closer every day. I've heard that windows can do virtualization and emulation too. Maybe so, but here is the only place I make a value judgment. So categorically, I prefer to run my closed source stuff under the control of open source, and not vice versa. Other than that, I see no need to claim any superiority in character by refusing to use the best tool for the job.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2019, 12:56:19 PM by CwF »